Video Production

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

Want to get pro-sounding audio in DaVinci Resolve? In this guide we’ll answer any questions you may have regarding editing audio in DaVinci’s video editor.

DaVinci Resolve has become one of the most popular video editors out there recently. Many longtime Premiere users have found themselves making the switch and for good reason. Unlike many other video editors Resolve has a dedicated Fairlight audio editing workstation which gives you the power to create incredible audio without any external software.

In this article we’ll answer any questions you may have regarding editing audio in DaVinci Resolve.

Don’t edit with DaVinci Resolve? We’ve got guides on editing audio in Adobe Premiere Pro, Avid Media Composer and Final Cut Pro X over on our blog.

How to Add Audio Track Layers In DaVinci Resolve

From the Edit page add a new track by right-clicking on one of your existing tracks and choosing Add New Track. You will want to choose either a stereo track, or a 5.1 surround sound track if you’re adding a track for ambient sound, sound effects, or music.

If you’re adding a track for dialogue, the process is exactly the same, but you will probably want to add a mono track to get the cleanest sound possible in your mix. If you put your dialogue in a stereo track, you could end up amplifying unwanted sounds, or running into problems when you start adjusting stereo width.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Change Audio Levels in DaVinci Resolve

The easiest way to adjust the volume of an individual audio clip in DaVinci Resolve is to select the clip, open the inspector, and adjust the volume slider. However, you can also mouse over the horizontal white line on the clip, left click, and drag up or down. Make sure that the clip is selected when you do this, or else it won’t work.

You can also adjust the levels of entire tracks. To do this, select the track by clicking on the left side of the track where the track name is. Then, open up the inspector, and adjust the volume slider. Alternatively, both the edit page and the Fairlight page have a mixer that you can open. The sliders on that mixer will also control the level of an entire track.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Detach Audio From a Clip In DaVinci Resolve

To separate audio from a video clip – ie, to remove the audio from a video file – simply click the chain link in the toolbar (located next to the magnet), or hit CTRL+SHIFT+L to link and unlink the audio from the video.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Record Audio in DaVinci Resolve

You can use the input section of the mixer to set up a microphone for voiceover recording. Simply click where it says “No Input,” and choose “Input.” On the left side of the module that pops up, choose your audio source, and on the right side of the module, choose the track that you want to record to. Finally, click “patch” in the bottom right corner. From there you can click the “R” just above the slider, and you’ll be armed to record.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Zoom in on Audio in DaVinci Resolve

If you want to get a better, more detailed look of your audio waveform in DaVinci Resolve, you can do this by holding ALT on your keyboard and using the scroll wheel on your mouse. Alternatively, you can use the zoom slider located at the bottom of the timeline in DaVinci Resolve. Keep in mind that this will only adjust the width of your clips, and not the height. 

To adjust the height of your audio clips, mouse over the bottom line of the track on the left side by the track name. Click on that bottom line, and drag the mouse up and down to increase or decrease the height of the track.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Add Keyframes to an Audio Track in DaVinci

Keyframing audio in DaVinci Resolve can be accomplished by selecting the clip you want to adjust, placing your playhead where you want to put the keyframe, and opening the inspector. There are multiple adjustments that you can use keyframes with. Those adjustments will have a keyframe symbol next to the slider in the inspector. Simply click on the keyframe symbol to set your first keyframe. New keyframes will be created every time you adjust the keyframed setting on that clip. 

You can also use keyboard shortcuts to add keyframes. CTRL + [ will add a dynamic keyframe, and CTRL + ] will add a static keyframe. New keyframes will be added on the selected clip, wherever the playhead is located.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Open the Audio Panel in DaVinci Resolve

Rather than having an audio panel like most NLEs, DaVinci Resolve has Fairlight, a fully-functional DAW, built right into the software. To access Fairlight, simply click on the music note at the bottom of the UI.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Make Audio Louder in DaVinci Resolve

Adjusting the volume of an audio clip can be done in the inspector, or directly on the audio clip. To adjust the volume in the inspector, select the audio clip and open the inspector by clicking on “Inspector” in the top right corner of the screen. From there you can use the volume slider to adjust the volume of the clip. You can adjust the volume of an entire track in the same way.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

To adjust the volume directly on the audio clip, place your cursor over the horizontal white line in the middle of the clip, click, and drag up or down.

How to Fade Audio in DaVinci Resolve

There are two ways to fade your audio. The first is to place your playhead where you want your fade to begin or end, select the audio clip, select Trim from the top menu, and choose either “Fade In To Playhead” or “Fade Out From Playhead.”

Your other option is to select the clip you want to fade, put your cursor over one of the white markers in the top corners of the clip, click, and drag the marker to the place in the clip where you want the fade to begin or end.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Crossfade Audio in DaVinci Resolve 

To add a crossfade in between two audio clips, you can either drag the crossfade effect to the break in the clips from the effects library, or you can hover your cursor over the break in the audio clips, right clip, and choose to add a crossfade.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Create Audio a Reactive Spectrum Visual in DaVinci Resolve

DaVinci Resolve’s Fusion page, is the page within DaVinci Resolve where you can create composites and effects. Unfortunately, Black Magic Design has yet to allow audio playback in Fusion. Fusion is strictly a video compositing tool, and therefore doesn’t really know that audio exists. It’s because of this that you can’t create effects that react to audio (such as audio waveforms and spectrums) using the native tools available in DaVinci Resolve. 

That being said, there are some third party plugins available that will allow you to create an audio spectrum, so not all hope is lost.

How to Add Audio Reverb in DaVinci Resolve

In DaVinci Resolve, adding additional effects such as reverb, echo, and distortion is easy. In the fairlight page, go into your Effects Library, and start dragging effects onto your audio clips. Each time you drag a new effect in, a module will pop up, where you can tweak your settings.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know

How to Pitchshift Audio in DaVinci Resolve

Changing the pitch of audio clips in DaVinci Resolve is easy. In the Fairlight page, select the clip you want to work with, open the inspector, and tweak the settings in the pitch section. The pitch controls are simple, but they are very sensitive. A little bit of tweaking goes a long way.

How to Edit Audio in DaVinci Resolve – All You Need to Know
June 17, 2020
Jay Lippman

Jay Lippman is a freelance video and audio editor. He has a YouTube channel where he teaches filming techniques, editing in Davinci Resolve, and reviews film making gear. Find out more at jaylippman.com

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